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Responsible Research Involving Children

  • Marilyn J. Field
    Correspondence
    Marilyn J. Field, PhD, Senior Program Officer, Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, 500 Fifth St NW, Washington, DC 20001
    Affiliations
    From the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (Dr Field), and the Education Steering Committee, Federation of Pediatric Organizations (Dr Behrman)
    Search for articles by this author
  • Richard E. Behrman
    Affiliations
    From the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (Dr Field), and the Education Steering Committee, Federation of Pediatric Organizations (Dr Behrman)
    Search for articles by this author
      Each year, advances in biomedical science save the lives of tens of thousands of children worldwide, prevent or limit disease or disability in many more, and improve the quality of life for countless others. Still, pediatricians and others have long argued that infants, children, and adolescents have not shared equally with adults in biomedical progress. In particular, many drugs that are prescribed for children have not been tested with children. This gap puts them at risk for dosing miscalculations and preventable harms related to metabolic and other differences between children and adults.
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