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Historical Perspective on Family-Centered Care

      Partnerships between families and their children’s medical providers are essential to ensuring quality health care. Around the country, families partner with providers to make decisions about their individual children and to improve health care practices, programs, and policies that affect all children. Such partnerships have not always been the norm. Families of children and youth with special health care needs (CYSHCN) and visionary professional leaders have identified the effective elements of collaborative family provider relationships. Their efforts over the past 40 years have transformed the relationship between families and health care providers, laying down an important foundation for the future. More still needs to be done, but much has been accomplished.
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      References

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