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A History of the Academic Pediatric Association’s Public Policy and Advocacy Initiatives

  • Judith S. Palfrey
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Judith S. Palfrey, MD, Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
    Affiliations
    Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass (Drs Palfrey and Schuster), and the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md (Dr Cheng)
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  • Tina L. Cheng
    Affiliations
    Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass (Drs Palfrey and Schuster), and the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md (Dr Cheng)
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  • Mark A. Schuster
    Affiliations
    Division of General Pediatrics, Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass (Drs Palfrey and Schuster), and the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md (Dr Cheng)
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      Throughout its 50-year history, the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) has recognized the importance of social, environmental, and public policy issues for children’s health. Since the organization’s inception, the APA and its members have taken an active interest in many major child health public policy initiatives (Table). APA members have worked to promote policies that benefit children’s health on a broad scale, conducting key research on health issues and health care interventions in order to inform policy debates, providing Congressional testimony, and leading initiatives for policy change. The APA has also worked to strengthen the network of child health advocates nationally and has encouraged public policy involvement among its members by sponsoring skills-building policy workshops and engaging its membership in advocacy activities.
      TableSelected Major Federal Child Health Legislation
      Date Legislation Impact
      1962 Vaccination Assistance Act PL 87-868 Control of diphtheria, tetanus, measles, mumps, rubella, etc.
      1962 Establishment of National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Research on childhood illness with subsequent interventions to counteract disease.
      1963 Title VII of the Public Health Services Act Established training programs to enhance primary care in pediatrics, family medicine, internal medicine, and dentistry.
      1965 Amendments to the Social Security Act Title XIX, Medicaid PL 89-97 Established a program of health insurance for the poor.
      1970 Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act PL 91-695 Removal of lead from paint. Significant decreases in cases of lead poisoning of children.
      1974 Health Professions Health Education Act of 1974 Training programs for health professionals, including pediatricians.
      1978 Health Services and Centers Act PL 95-626 By 2005, there were 1000 federally qualified health centers serving 15 million people in the United States
      1990 Ryan White CARE Act PL 101-381 Grants to improve care for individuals and families with HIV.
      1997 State Child Health Insurance Program PL 105-33 Extended insurance benefits to children above the financial eligibility line for Medicaid.
      2009 Children’s Health Insurance Program Reauthorization Act PL 111-3 Reauthorized Child Health Insurance Program, extending coverage to 4.1 million new children.
      2010 Affordable Care Act PL 111-148 Universal health care insurance coverage. Specific patient protections.
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