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Pediatricians’ Attitudes About Collaborations With Other Community Vaccinators in the Delivery of Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

  • Allison Kempe
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Allison Kempe, MD, MPH, 1056 E 19th Avenue, B032, Denver, Colorado 80218.
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Pascale Wortley
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Sean O’Leary
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Lori A. Crane
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Matthew F. Daley
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Shannon Stokley
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Christine Babbel
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Fran Dong
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Brenda Beaty
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Laura Seewald
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • Christina Suh
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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  • L. Miriam Dickinson
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Daley, and Suh), Family Medicine (Dr Dickinson), Colorado School of Public Health (Drs Kempe and Crane), and the Colorado Health Outcomes Program (Drs Kempe, Daley, Ms Dong, and Ms Beaty), University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colo; The Children’s Outcomes Research Program (Drs Kempe, O’Leary, Crane, Daley, Suh, and Dickinson; Ms Babbel, Ms Dong, Ms Beaty, and Ms Seewald), The Children’s Hospital, Aurora, Colo; and the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (Dr Wortley and Ms Stokley), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Ga
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Published:September 07, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2011.07.004

      Abstract

      Objective

      Achieving universal influenza vaccination among children may necessitate collaborative delivery involving both practices and community vaccinators. We assessed among pediatricians nationally their preferences regarding location of influenza vaccination for patient subgroups and their attitudes about collaborative delivery methods.

      Methods

      The design/setting was a national survey conducted from July 2009 to October 2009. Participants included a representative sample of pediatricians from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

      Results

      The response rate was 79% (330 of 416). Physicians felt strongly that vaccination should occur in their practice for children with chronic conditions (52%) and healthy 6–24-month-old infants (48%), but few felt strongly about healthy 5–18-year-olds (17%). Most (78%) thought having multiple delivery sites increased vaccination rates, and 86% thought that influenza vaccine should be available at school. Physicians reported being very/somewhat willing to hold joint community clinics with public health entities (76%) and to suggest to patient subgroups that they receive vaccine at community sites, including public clinics or pharmacies (76%). The most frequently reported barriers to collaborative delivery with community sites or school-located delivery included concerns about the following: estimating the amount of vaccine to order if children are vaccinated elsewhere (community 56%; school 80%); transfer of vaccine records (community 57%; school 78%); and reluctance of families to go outside of the office (community 45%; school 74%).

      Conclusions

      Most physicians are in favor of school-located or collaborative influenza vaccine delivery with community vaccinators, especially for healthy school-aged children. Collaborative approaches will require planning to ensure transfer of records, effective targeting of subgroups, and provisions to protect providers from being left with extra influenza supply.

      Keywords

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