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Assessment of Parental Report for 2009–2010 Seasonal and Monovalent H1N1 Influenza Vaccines among Children in the Emergency Department or Hospital

  • Katherine A. Poehling
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Katherine A. Poehling, MD, MPH, Department of Pediatrics, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157.
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Lauren Vannoy
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Laney S. Light
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Cynthia K. Suerken
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Beverly M. Snively
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Alejandra Guitierrez
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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  • Timothy R. Peters
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics (Drs Poehling, Guitierrez, and Peters; Ms Vannoy), Biostatistical Sciences (Ms Light and Suerken; Dr. Snively), and Epidemiology and Prevention (Dr Poehling), Wake Forest School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC
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Published:October 28, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2011.08.006

      Abstract

      Objective

      To assess the validity of parental report for seasonal and monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccinations among children 6 months to <18 years who were recommended to receive both vaccines in 2009–2010.

      Methods

      Children with fever or respiratory symptoms were prospectively enrolled in both emergency departments in Forsyth County, North Carolina, and the only pediatric hospital in the region. Enrollment occurred from September 1, 2009, through April 12, 2010, during the H1N1 influenza pandemic. A parental questionnaire was administered by trained interviewers to ascertain the status of seasonal and monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccines. Parental report was compared with that documented in the medical record and/or the North Carolina immunization registry.

      Results

      Among 297 enrolled children 6 months to <18 years of age, 174 (59%) were 6 months to 4 years, 67 (23%) were 5–8 years, and 56 (19%) were 9 to <18 years. Parents reported that 140 (47%) children had received ≥1 dose of 2009–2010 influenza vaccine—128 (43%) for seasonal vaccine and 63 (21%) for H1N1 vaccine. Confirmed vaccination data indicated that 156 (53%) children had received ≥1 dose of any 2009–2010 vaccine—120 (40%) for seasonal vaccine and 53 (18%) for H1N1 vaccine. Parental report of any seasonal influenza vaccination was 92% sensitive and 86% specific and had a kappa of 0.76. Parental report for any H1N1 influenza vaccination was 88% sensitive and 92% specific with a kappa of 0.71.

      Conclusions

      Parental report of 2009–2010 seasonal and monovalent H1N1 influenza vaccinations was sensitive and specific and had reasonable agreement with the medical record and/or immunization registry.

      Keywords

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