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The Intersection of Flexibility and Outcomes in Pediatric Education

  • Jerry L. Rushton
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Jerry L. Rushton, MD, MPH, Riley Hospital for Children, RI-5867, 702 Barnhill Drive, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202.
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics (Drs Rushton and Djuricich) and Department of Medicine (Dr Djuricich), Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Ind
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  • Alexander M. Djuricich
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics (Drs Rushton and Djuricich) and Department of Medicine (Dr Djuricich), Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Ind
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      Pediatric residency training is rapidly evolving, with more options becoming available for individualized and varied pathways. New duty hours and proposed pediatric residency review committee requirements of the Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) were developed with components that may allow for more individual program flexibility.

      ACGME Task Force on Quality Care and Professionalism. The ACGME 2011 Duty Hour Standard: Enhancing Quality of Care, Supervision and Resident Professional Development. Online monograph, 2011. Available at: http://www.acgme-2010standards.org/pdf/monographs/jgme-monograph.pdf. Accessed November 11, 2011.

      The Residency Review and Redesign in Pediatrics Project and Initiative for Innovation in Pediatric Education (IIPE) have called for program innovations that “change pediatric residency education through a carefully monitored, outcome-directed experimentation.”
      • Carraccio C.
      • Englander R.
      Innovation in pediatric education: the path to transforming pediatric graduate medical education.
      Training for individuals no longer must follow a traditional 36 consecutive months. Part-time positions, combined residency training, research, and other individualized pathways are now common in graduate medical education (GME). The education, coordination, and administration of residents in different training tracks have important implications for educators and program leadership. Furthermore, new duty hour regulations have created other limitations in scheduling and restructuring of training.
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      References

      1. ACGME Task Force on Quality Care and Professionalism. The ACGME 2011 Duty Hour Standard: Enhancing Quality of Care, Supervision and Resident Professional Development. Online monograph, 2011. Available at: http://www.acgme-2010standards.org/pdf/monographs/jgme-monograph.pdf. Accessed November 11, 2011.

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