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Competency 2. Organize and prioritize responsibilities to provide patient care that is safe, effective, and efficient

      In the 2001 report, Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) describes “the prevailing model of health care delivery [as] complicated, comprising layers of processes and handoffs that patients and families find bewildering and clinicians view as wasteful . . . and fail[ing] to build on the strengths of all health professionals involved to ensure that care is timely, safe, and appropriate.”
      • Institute of Medicine Committee on Quality of Health Care in America
      Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century.
      The IOM described 6 aims for improvement: safety, effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, efficiency, and equality in patient care. With this in mind, this competency for organizing and prioritizing responsibilities to provide patient care that is safe, effective, and efficient finds important relationships with several other competencies in all competency domains. Given the broad and deep relationships to other competencies that address the provision of patient care that is safe, effective, and efficient (second half of the current competency), this competency will focus on the skills needed for organization and prioritization of this care (first half of the current competency) from the perspective of how these skills can lead to care that is safe, effective, and efficient.
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