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Competency 3. Provide transfer of care that ensures seamless transitions

      With the advent of work duty hours and the Institute of Medicine reports on patient safety of the past decade, the skill of transferring care between providers and teams has become paramount. The literature on teaching and assessing handoff communication has proliferated in the realms of nursing,
      • Amato E.J.
      • Barba M.P.
      • Vealey R.J.
      Hand-off communication: a requisite for perioperative patient safety.
      • Sandlin D.
      Improving patient safety by implementing a standardized and consistent approach to hand-off communication.
      patient safety,
      • Arora V.
      • Johnson J.
      A model for building a standardized hand-off protocol.
      medical education,
      • Kalet A.
      • Pugnaire M.P.
      • Cole-Kelly K.
      • et al.
      Teaching communication in clinical clerkships: models from the Macy initiative in health communications.
      • Duffy F.D.
      • Gordon G.H.
      • Whelan G.
      • et al.
      Assessing competence in communication and interpersonal skills: the Kalamazoo II report.
      and medical specialties.
      • Brinkman W.B.
      • Geraghty S.R.
      • Lanphear B.P.
      • et al.
      Evaluation of resident communication skills and professionalism: a matter of perspective?.
      • Fletcher K.E.
      • Wiest F.C.
      • Halasyamani L.
      • et al.
      How do hospitalized patients feel about resident work hours, fatigue, and discontinuity of care?.
      Handoffs occur in a variety of settings and contexts. For example, handoffs may occur within units, between units, between specialists and generalists, between subspecialists in different specialties, or between inpatient and outpatient settings. In addition, they may occur in person, by telephone, or by written document.
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      References

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        Hand-off communication: a requisite for perioperative patient safety.
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        Assessing competence in communication and interpersonal skills: the Kalamazoo II report.
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