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Vision 2020: A Year in (Re)View From the Association of Pediatric Program Directors

  • Michael B. Pitt
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Michael B. Pitt, MD, Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children's Hospital, 6th Floor S Bldg, 657 | 2450 Riverside Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55454
    Affiliations
    Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota School of Medicine & Masonic Children's Hospital (MB Pitt), Minneapolis, Minn
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  • Patricia Poitevien
    Affiliations
    Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University & Hasbro Children's Hospital (P Poitevien), Providence, RI
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  • Rebecca Blankenburg
    Affiliations
    Division of Pediatric Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine & Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (R Blankenburg), Palo Alto, Calif
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Published:August 19, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2020.08.012
      What's New
      After more than 10 years, and over 60 articles in the View from the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD) section (available for review at https://www.academicpedsjnl.net/content/acap-view-from-the-appd), we are happy to introduce a new annual feature. Each year, the section editor will collaborate with the APPD President and President-Elect to provide a commentary highlighting the work featured in last year's View from the APPD section. Our goal is to showcase themes from the work published each year and put these into the context of the goals of the APPD as a whole.
      In 2009, Academic Pediatrics became the official journal of the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD), the organization charged with providing residency and fellowship leaders the tools to support excellence in pediatric graduate medical education (GME).
      • Guralnick S.
      View from the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD).
      ,
      • Roberts KB
      • Degnon LE
      • McGregor RS
      Association of Pediatric Program Directors: the first 25 years.
      This collaboration has allowed the APPD membership to communicate important issues affecting GME to the academic community through a dedicated section of the journal called the View from the APPD.
      Last year, we published 8 articles in this section, each highlighting a focus of the APPD's strategic plan. This plan, called Vision 2020, outlines 4 core goals for the APPD: 1) development of programs and members; 2) optimization of organizational excellence; 3) enhancement of leadership and collaboration; and 4) promoting rigorous research and scholarship.

      APPD strategic plan. Available at: https://www.appd.org/about/strategic-plan/. 2020. Accessed August 8, 2020.

      While these goals are intended to drive organizational change in the APPD, the domains serve as a useful framework for grouping the themes of the papers published in this section of the journal in 2020.
      Development of Programs and Members: Foster program development through supporting members in their professional development, academic advancement, career satisfaction and administrative activity.

      APPD strategic plan. Available at: https://www.appd.org/about/strategic-plan/. 2020. Accessed August 8, 2020.

      The APPD's commitment to program improvement through faculty development is a core aspect of their mission. In the strategic vision, there are several areas worthy of focus within this domain including promoting wellness and resilience, enhancing mentorship, and pursuing diversity, equity, and inclusion in all aspects of GME. Several articles highlighted innovative approaches taken by programs or frameworks for others to consider in the development of these initiatives.
      For example, Weiss and Li adapted Maslow's hierarchy of needs framework to systematically address well-being against the backdrop of the unique difficulties of the novel coronavirus 2019 pandemic.
      • Weiss PG
      • Li STT.
      Leading change to address the needs and well-being of trainees during the COVID-19 pandemic.
      In their paper, they challenged the model of the buzzword of wellness as a luxury or even an ideal, and highlighted the core well-being needs of providers and how they are particularly vulnerable in crisis. They provided dozens of actionable ideas for the community, institution, and department to consider in supporting trainee well-being, and further supported implementation by mapping these tangible concepts to a change management framework. Papers like these that provide both thought leadership and faculty development through tangible, how-to instructions are a good fit for this section.
      We also aim to feature articles that share ready-to-implement tools or approaches that have been evaluated and can be easily adapted within GME programs that are likely faced with similar challenges. In a recent issue, for example, Rogers and colleagues shared the results of a pilot program where residents administered the flu vaccine to each other as part of a workshop.
      • Rogers A
      • Porada K
      • Weisgerber M
      Not throwing away my shot: leveraging a peer vaccination workshop to increase residents’ immunization skills.
      Not only did this easily replicable intervention lead to increased confidence and supported vaccine compliance, but it led to a significant increase in how residents reported their preparedness for giving immunizations on the annual Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education survey. In another example of a single-institution innovation that can be adapted to other programs, Cree-Green and colleagues described an intervention aimed at supporting residents who become parents during training.
      • Cree-Green M
      • Cree J
      • Urban K
      • et al.
      A structured neonatal parenting elective: an approach for parenting leave during residency.
      They created a structured at-home elective for new parents with defined goals and objectives and evaluated various metrics before and after implementation. With access to this elective, residents reported feeling supported as new parents and able to take statistically more time home with their new baby with less need for unpaid time.
      In the teaching and mentorship domain of faculty development, Frey-Vogel and colleagues described an instrument for mentoring resident-led large group teaching through the gathering of structured actionable feedback.
      • Frey-Vogel AS
      • Dzara K
      • Gifford KA
      • et al.
      The development of an instrument for faculty to assess resident-led large group teaching.
      The authors went beyond merely describing the rigorous process their multi-institutional team carried out to develop and evaluate their assessment tool. They shared a downloadable version of the tool for programs to use themselves. This approach of not just, “We did this, it worked, the end,” but “We did this, it worked, here, you do it too!” is a primary goal of the work featured in the View from the APPD section.
      Organizational Excellence: Maintain a dynamic organization with efficient and effective leadership that is responsive to its members.

      APPD strategic plan. Available at: https://www.appd.org/about/strategic-plan/. 2020. Accessed August 8, 2020.

      While this domain of the APPD's strategic vision is primarily focused on improving the structure of organization itself, the fruits of these efforts can be seen in much of the work featured in 2020 in the journal. For example, Reed and colleagues published the results of a national survey of pediatric residency programs’ approaches to teaching and assessing residents’ communications skills.
      • Reed S
      • Frey-Vogel A
      • Frost M
      Look who's talking: a survey of pediatric program directors on communication skills education in pediatric residency programs.
      Beyond their important results which identified a gap in communication training, their work described benefits of their engagement with 2 APPD Learning Communities: the Assessment Learning Community, which is how the 3 authors came to collaborate on the study, and the Research and Scholarship Learning Community who they credit with providing critical review of their survey instrument.
      Additionally, we are able to leverage our connection with the APPD's organizational structure to share special calls with the membership outside of the traditional View from the APPD pieces. For example, in April 2020, we put out a special call for educational innovations in response to the novel coronavirus 2019 pandemic and received a robust response with over 170 submissions, the majority of which came from APPD members, describing GME innovations.
      • Pitt MB
      • Li STT
      • Klein M
      Novel educational responses to COVID-19: what is here to stay?.
      Also, in the November/December 2020 issue, we featured an important commentary from APPD leadership describing their commitment to confronting racism within APPD, in GME programs and health care centers, and in caring for patients and communities.
      • Blankenburg R
      • Poitevien P
      • Gonzalez del Rey J
      • et al.
      Confronting racism: a statement from the APPD.
      Leadership & Collaboration: Advance GME through engagement and collaboration.

      APPD strategic plan. Available at: https://www.appd.org/about/strategic-plan/. 2020. Accessed August 8, 2020.

      One of the APPD's goals is to support collaboration of member programs and other organizations who share a similar mission. Myers and colleagues highlighted an example of collaborating with other APPD institutions in their paper describing a chief resident exchange program.
      • Myers RE
      • Ponitz K
      • Ramundo M
      Pediatric chief resident exchange program—a novel method to share educational ideas across training programs.
      They created an annual visiting chief resident program among members of the APPD Mid-America Region and reported feedback from participants as well as the programmatic changes that resulted from the intervention.
      In an example of using the View from the APPD as a platform for a call to action among program leadership, the paper by Liao and colleagues called attention to the “Match Frenzy,” the term used to describe the increasingly stressful process of applying for residency.
      • Liao N
      • Mahan J
      • Scherzer R
      The pediatric match frenzy: an overview and an approach for mentoring medical students.
      In addition to providing an overview of the problem, they described their program's approach and the need for collaboration between medical schools and residency programs.
      Research & Scholarship: Facilitate rigorous educational research, application and dissemination of best practices in GME which will lead to enhance the quality of future general and subspecialty pediatricians.

      APPD strategic plan. Available at: https://www.appd.org/about/strategic-plan/. 2020. Accessed August 8, 2020.

      The fourth aim of the APPD's Vision 2020 is to support rigorous research and scholarship. One paper this year described a program's approach to enhancing scholarly activity among their pediatric residents. Romanos-Sirakis and colleagues reported a significant increase in participation in scholarship and successful dissemination after implementing a pediatric research and scholarship committee to provide dedicated oversight and mentorship.
      • Romanos-Sirakis E
      • Varghese S
      • Demissie S
      • et al.
      Pediatric research and scholarship committee: an initiative to enhance scholarly activity of pediatric residents.
      Academic Pediatrics supports this APPD goal of promoting rigorous research in its commitment to publishing high-quality educational scholarship both in the View from the APPD section and within the broader journal. In fact, educational scholarship has seen the largest growth of any section of the journal over the last decade. The 8 articles featured in the View from the APPD section this year exemplify the strengths of the journal's collaboration with the APPD and its commitment to the strategic vision.

      Acknowledgments

      We would like to thank the previous View from the APPD editors Patty Hicks, Dan West, and Robert Vinci for their vision and dedication. Additionally, we would like to thank the education editors at Academic Pediatrics, Su-Ting Li and Melissa Klein, for their continued work in making the journal a premier home for education scholarship in pediatrics.

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