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Coaching the Fundamentals: Exploring the Applicability and Usefulness of a Novel Skills-Based Feedback Modality

  • Brandon Kappy
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Brandon Kappy, MD, MPP, Division of Emergency Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45229
    Affiliations
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (B Kappy and D Schumacher), Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Angela Statile
    Affiliations
    Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (A Statile and L Herrmann), Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Daniel Schumacher
    Affiliations
    Division of Emergency Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (B Kappy and D Schumacher), Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Elizabeth Lendrum
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (E Lendrum), Cincinnati, Ohio
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  • Lisa Herrmann
    Affiliations
    Division of Hospital Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (A Statile and L Herrmann), Cincinnati, Ohio
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Published:December 25, 2021DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2021.12.023

      Abstract

      Objective

      Receiving and integrating feedback is a key to medical trainee development. To assist trainees seeking improvement through daily formative feedback and deliberate practice, the authors created a new skills-based framework called microskills, derived from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACMGE) milestones and entrustable professional activities. The authors then explored pediatric resident perceptions around the applicability and usefulness of microskills.

      Methods

      The authors conducted 4 qualitative semistructured focus groups of 28 pediatric residents. Focus group prompts asked participants to reflect on microskills as a new feedback modality and microskills in relation to existing feedback and assessment approaches. Focus group transcripts were analyzed through inductive thematic analysis through an iterative process until theoretical saturation was reached.

      Results

      Participants felt microskills could facilitate skill-building and improvement, allow for consistent, targeted feedback, and establish a practice of coaching. Participants also perceived microskills’ future success to be dependent on how the modality is adopted and utilized alongside existing assessment tools.

      Conclusions

      Trainees found microskills to be a granular, context-based, coaching tool that could improve skill-building and the feedback process. Microskills’ emphasis on feedback and their delineation of clinical skills that can be repeatedly practiced has the potential to provide a roadmap for trainee growth. Though microskills could fill a current need in the medical training landscape, they are not a substitute for existing assessment frameworks.

      Keywords

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