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Association of Neighborhood Characteristics With Pediatric Asthma

  • Emmanuel Aryee
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to Emmanuel Aryee, MD, Division of General Academic Pediatrics, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, 125 Nashua Street, Boston, MA 02114
    Affiliations
    MassGeneral Hospital for Children, (E Aryee, J M Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic) Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • James M. Perrin
    Affiliations
    MassGeneral Hospital for Children, (E Aryee, J M Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic) Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

    Department of Pediatrics (JM Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Dorothea Iannuzzi
    Affiliations
    Brigham and Women's Hospital (D Iannuzzi), Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Karen A. Kuhlthau
    Affiliations
    MassGeneral Hospital for Children, (E Aryee, J M Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic) Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

    Department of Pediatrics (JM Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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  • Nicolas M Oreskovic
    Affiliations
    MassGeneral Hospital for Children, (E Aryee, J M Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic) Division of General Academic Pediatrics, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

    Department of Pediatrics (JM Perrin, KA Kuhlthau, NM Oreskovic), Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
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Published:January 11, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2022.01.001

      Abstract

      Objective

      To examine associations between neighborhood characteristics and asthma prevalence and severity among low-income children in a large nationally representative sample.

      Methods

      Data source: 2018 National Survey of Children's Health, limited to low-income children, ages 0–17 years. We grouped parent responses about neighborhood characteristics into 5 scores: neighborhood support, safety, resources and quality, and a total score. Logistic regression compared rates and severity of asthma by neighborhood scores, adjusting for age, sex, race, and income.

      Results

      Of 8,653 low-income children, those living in neighborhoods with better total neighborhood scores were significantly less likely to have parent-reported asthma; OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.8–1.0; P = .02, with similar findings for children living in neighborhoods with higher support, safety, and quality scores. We found no associations between neighborhood scores and asthma severity in this population.

      Conclusions

      Favorable neighborhoods are associated with lower parent-reported asthma prevalence in low-income children but not asthma severity. These data may support providers and policy makers interested in child asthma in addressing neighborhood improvement.

      Keywords

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