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EASE-ing the Way for Pediatric Providers and Parents: The Engagement and Access to Special Education (EASE) Clinic

Published:February 16, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2022.02.011
      The Engagement and Access to Special Education clinic supports primary care providers and parents whose children need special education services. The clinic has grown steadily since its inception. Initial reflections reveal increased empowerment by parents after working with the clinic.

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