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Association Between Workforce Gender Distribution and Lifetime Earning Potential in the Pediatric Subspecialties

  • Eva Catenaccio
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Eva Catenaccio, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19104.
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Neurology (E Catenaccio), Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA
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  • Jonathan M. Rochlin
    Affiliations
    Department of Emergency Medicine, Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine (JM Rochlin), Maimonides Medical Center, Brooklyn, NY
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  • Harold K. Simon
    Correspondence
    Address correspondence to: Harold Simon, MD, MBA, Department of Pediatrics, 1760 Haygood Dr, Atlanta, GA 30322
    Affiliations
    Departments of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine (HK Simon), Emory University School of Medicine and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, Atlanta, GA
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Published:February 24, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.acap.2022.02.012

      Abstract

      Objective

      Examine the relationship between the gender distribution of the pediatric subspecialty workforce and lifetime earning potential.

      Methods

      We estimated lifetime earning potential for pediatric academic subspecialists using mean debt and compensation data from national physician surveys for 2019 to 2020 and examined the relationship between the workforce gender composition and lifetime earning potential across the pediatric subspecialties using linear regression analysis.

      Results

      Subspecialties with a higher proportion of women had lower lifetime earning potential (-$55,215 in lifetime earning potential/1% increase in the percentage of female subspecialists; P value .002, 95% CI -$24,429 to -$86,000). Similarly, a higher proportion of female first-year fellows was associated with lower lifetime earning potential (-$61,808 in lifetime earning potential/1% increase in the percentage of female first-year fellows; P value .026, 95% CI -$9,210 to -$114,405).

      Conclusions

      Consistent with patterns seen in other areas of adult medicine and surgery, pediatric subspecialties with higher proportions of women, such as adolescent medicine and endocrinology, tended to have lower lifetime earning potentials than subspecialties with higher proportions of men, such as cardiology and critical care. Lower earning subspecialties also tended to train higher proportions of women, suggesting that this trend may worsen over time as pediatrics in general and individual subspecialties in particular become increasingly female predominant.

      Keywords

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