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Clinician Perceptions on Literacy Promotion in Pediatric Continuity Clinics

      Abstract

      Background: Reach Out and Read (ROR) is a widely implemented evidence-based Literacy Promotion (LP) intervention. Recent data has shown that there is variability in both LP training for pediatric residents and implementation of ROR. However, little is known about the perceptions regarding LP and the relationship with training.
      Objective: To describe LP perceptions of pediatric and internal medicine/pediatrics residents and faculty and determine the relationship between LP training and perceptions of LP.
      Methods: Faculty and residents at participating sites completed an anonymous online survey on LP perceptions and training. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests, and logistic regression modeling.
      Results: 473 faculty and 1216 residents at 42 pediatric training programs participated. Faculty vs resident status was a significant predictor of almost all perception questions. Most faculty (65.3%) and residents (44.3%) completely agreed that it is the job of pediatricians to assess and encourage reading (p<0.0001). Most faculty (69.6%) and residents (51.5%) completely agreed that LP is as important as advice about car seats, bike helmets, and “back-to-sleep” (p<0.0001). More faculty (65.8%) than residents (46.6%) completely agreed with the statement “discussing sharing books with children at health supervision visits can be an effective early intervention strategy,” (p<0.0001). More faculty (34%) compared to residents (18.2%) completely agreed they felt confident modeling reading for parents during the visit (p<0.0001).
      Conclusions: Faculty status predicted most favorable LP perceptions, while continuity clinic training and learning in-clinic from others predicted some favorable LP perceptions.

      Keywords

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